Tapped – Review

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According to the first sentence of the movie Tapped, “By 2030 2/3 of the world will be lacking access to clean drinking water”. That’s a bold and scary statement. Right now, more than 1 billion people in the developing world don’t have access to it, and since there are about 7 billion of us right now, we’re already at a problem level (at least in the opinion of one in every seven people). So, it does seem plausible, depending on growth and how well the global community can get along. Wait a minute…am I betting on world peace? Yikes!

According to the movie, Nestle, Coke and Pepsi have been “water mining” in small towns in the US by taking the water for free and then selling it back to consumers. The towns in these rural areas got wise and have been trying to fight for their rights, but so far the corporations seem to be winning as even during drought conditions the companies don’t stop, even while other citizens in the community have to cut back on usage.

What other points do they make? Aquafina and Dasani are just filtered tap water. Bottled water is not regulated if sold within state lines, so the FDA only checks in if it is sold out of state, and most are collected and sold within their own states. Should the companies test their own water, they are not required to make reports available to the public. Also, petrochemical plants make the plastic bottles that the water comes in, which links this industry to the oil industry. People living next to these plants, like the one in Corpus Cristie feel that they are causing sickness and birth defects  in communities.

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But that’s not all, they also talk about contamination, BPA (interesting to note they claim that Wal-mart took the initiative to take products with BPA in them off their shelves before the FDA, meaning this often maligned super shopping source may have been more effective than the FDA – huh?) water contamination and about pollution (like the ocean garbage patches where plastic is more plentiful than plankton).

I liked this documentary as it was a pretty easy watch, made all its points concisely and seemed to have info to back up their claims and had a pretty good soundtrack to boot. :) It’s interesting, because although this is another documentary with an obvious bias, it was extremely convincing, which just gets me excited for doing more research. (yeah…I’m weird). I wasn’t much of a bottled water drinker anyway (mind you this is because I’m cheap. If I can get it out of a tap for a few bucks less I’m on it) but this movie really gets you thinking that maybe all of us should give it up, cut it down, or at the very least find a nice non leachy, environmentally friendly glass or steel bottle. Or maybe that’s just me – a hippy in training. :) Peace out.

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Here’s a trailer:

Want to read more on this? Here’s some resources:

$83.49 For A Case Of Water? Welcome To Nunavut – Huffington post article May 9, 2014

The Privatization of Water: Nestlé Denies that Water is a Fundamental Human Right – Centre for research on globalization

Water boxed in cartons touted by U.S. firm as eco-friendly – CBC news May 12, 2014

Bottled-water giant Nestlé in showdown with Ontario conservation group over water use – June 4 2013 yahoo news

National resources defence council official site

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2 thoughts on “Tapped – Review

    • Agreed! Let me know what you think of it. In some cases it’s seemed a bit dated, but I thought they did a good job. Thanks for reading my posts, and commenting! :)

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